FANDOM


Courtrooms are sometimes scenes of high drama and their decisions are important sources of authority. So it is only natural that fictional court cases feature in science fiction.

ListEdit

Science FictionEdit

  • Amalgamated Products v. Hendricks - Ben H. Winters's novel Underground Airlines, p. 19
  • Allison, Allison & Allison v. The State of California - Michael P. Kube-McDowell's novel The Quiet Pools, p. 140
  • Durksen v. Hawksworth - Robert J. Sawyer's 2013 novel Red Planet Blues, p. 131. This U.S. Supreme Crt. decision held that a mind transferred from a biological human body to an artifical human body - that of U.S. President Durksen - also transferred legal personhood.
  • NAR v. United States - Arthur C. Clarke and Michael Kube-McDowell's 1999 novel Trigger, p. 382.
  • People of the Colony of Baphomet v. Jamshar Singh, Deceased - H. Beam Piper's novel Little Fuzzy, p. 164
  • Reinsberg vs. the State of Missouri - Robert A. Heinlein's novel Stranger in a Strange Land, p. 52
  • The Unadmitted Peoples of Antarctica v. Robert Wengernook, Brian Overwhite, Major General Roger Tarmac, Dr. William Randstable,Reverend Peter Sparrow, George Paxton - James Morrow's 1986 novel This is the Way the World Ends, p. 169
  • In the 2006 film Idiocracy the United States has replaced the Supreme Court with the "Extreme Court", which sentences the protagonist of the film to a "rehabilitation" death match.

Other GenresEdit

  • Jarndyce v. Jarndyce - Charles Dickens's novel Bleak House. This is English Court of Chancery case involves the fate of a large inheritance which drags on for so many generations that legal costs devour the entire estate. Dickens used it to attack the chancery court system as being near totally worthless.


LinksEdit